First Mammal Species Recognized as Extinct Due to Climate Change

A small rodent that lived only on a single island off Australia is likely the world’s first mammal to become a casualty of climate change, scientists reported in June 2016. The government of Australia has now officially recognized the Bramble Cay melomys (Melomys rubicola) as extinct. The animal seems to …

We Are Eating Large Wild Animals into Extinction

Much of the planet’s megafauna is being driven extinct because of the usual causes: habitat loss and rampant poaching for body parts like horns, bones and tusks. But there is another reason large vertebrates are going extinct: people keep on eating them. A team of researchers has analyzed how human …

Prickly But Unprotected: 18 Percent of Cactus Species at Risk

Nearly a fifth of the world’s cactus species are unprotected by the world’s national parks and other conservation areas, making them one of the most at-risk groups of species on the planet, a new study finds. The study, published in the journal Conservation Biology, maps out where each cactus species …

52 Percent of World’s Birds of Prey Populations in Decline

Grim news for the world’s raptors—an iconic group of birds consisting of hawks, falcons, kites, eagles, vultures and owls. After analyzing the status of all 557 raptor species, biologists discovered that 18 percent of these birds are threatened with extinction and 52 percent have declining global populations, making them more …

Red List Research Finds 26,000 Global Species under Extinction Threat

More than 26,000 of the world’s species are now threatened, according to the latest red list assessment of the natural world, adding to fears the planet is entering a sixth wave of extinctions. New research, particularly in Australia, has widened the scope of the annual stocktake, which is compiled by …